Pictures Tell Us Everythings

People read but not all of them love to read. They just had a massive aversion  at reading long articles or documents, so they tend to find somethings that tell them messages. For examples, a pictures, graphics, videos. The New York Times(1921) once stated that ‘People want pictures. It helps them visualize the merchandise and gives them a better idea of what you have for sale than a mere description would.’

Gary(1999) argues that ‘People will generally stop to look at a picture far more readily than they will read a headline.’ It clearly shown that advertisement communicates message through visual first, only then by verbal.

Robert(2013) mentions that ‘As the twentieth century progressed, photography increasingly displaced hand-drawn imagery in print advertising, but a talented illustrator has always been able to bring a distinctive visual feel.’ It proved that either photography or hand-drawn imagery, both are important in advertising as it communicates messages.

 

1921, ‘Use of Pictures in Advertising’, The New York Times, 22 May. Available from http://query.nytimes.com/mem/archive-free/pdf?res=F50610FC345B1B7A93C0AB178ED85F458285F9 [18 October 2013]
Gary, W. (1999) How to Write An Effective Ad: Part 2: The Picture. Available http://www.marketingpsychology.com/article5.htm [Accessed on 18 October 2013]
Robert, S. (2012) 10 Principles of Good Advertising, London: Vivays
Russell, D. (2013) If a Picture worth a thousand words, why don’t we use them more?. Available http://www.campaignlive.co.uk/opinion/1191240/ [Accessed on 18 October 2013]

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